How to Prevent & Respond to a Poison Emergency

6 ways to keep your home poison safe & where to get expert help if a poisoning occurs.
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6 ways to keep your home poison safe & where to get expert help if a poisoning occurs.

Next week is National Poison Prevention Week (March 19th-25th), a great reminder to brush up on how to prevent and respond to a poison emergency. More than a million poison exposures occur every year in U.S. with children younger than 6 years. 

There are two ways to get free, confidential, expert help if a poisoning occurs according to the National Capital Poison Center. Either:

There’s no need to memorize that contact info, either. The National Capital Poison Center provides a new “text-to-save” functionality. Text “poison” to 484848 (don’t type the quotes) to save the contact info directly to your smart phone (standard text messaging rates apply). 

You can also download the vcard at http://vcrd.co/poison/4222 and share it with babysitters, grandparents, family and friends.

6 Ways to Keep Your Home Poison Safe:

  1. Up, up and away! Keep medications and poisonous household products out of your child’s sight and reach. Locked up is best.
  2. Avoid container transfer. Some of the most devastating poisonings occur when toxic products are poured into food or beverage containers, then mistaken for food or drink.
  3. Read the label and follow the directions. Misusing products can have dire consequences.
  4. Use child-resistant packaging. It’s not child-proof, but so much better than nothing. Even if it’s inconvenient to use, child-resistant packaging and locks could save a life.
  5. Keep button batteries away from children. Swallowed batteries can burn through your child’s esophagus and cause permanent injury or even death.
  6. Keep laundry pods out of your child’s reach. They are as toxic as they are colorful and squishy.

Need more prevention reminders? Text “poison” to 22828 to subscribe to The Poison Post® for free, quarterly poison prevention updates by email. Or go to www.poison.org for more tips.